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The Matrix Revisited: For the First Time

For those of you who do not know (and honest to god- why should you?) my name is Paul Durante, and among other things, I write a blog, tweet absurdly stupid things (which you can find @DewmontPaul btw :)) and write blog posts that like twenty people read.  Such is the life opf anEnglish major I suppose.  I also have recently debuted a web series for those of you who are interested.  I wrote and directed in it, and in this episode I even play a man named after a food dish……

But alas, such matters are not why we gather hear today.  Rather, we come together to discuss a far more important matter than my shortcomings: the Matrix.  For those of you who do not know (I assure you, I was among your ranks until last night) the Matrix, is a film in which our protagonist “Neo” discovers that his life is not as he had cpnvieved it, but rather the [roduct of a program that decieved the human race into believing that all was real.  As you find out in the first film (and for the record I have yet to see the other two) the world ended when humainty created and then subsequently went to war with AI that we created.  In the process of pursuing that war, we blocked out the sun in the hopes that it would terminate our solar powered AI friends, but such was not the case, and we subsequently went extinct….Except that we didn’t.  rather than allowing us to die out, robots created an articial world for us to occupy, in which things are essentially as they had been in 1999.  And it is with this point that I do believe I am in disagreement with the general public.

Last night I watched this film with my wife.

“What assholes,’ I commented once we were done.

“I know right,” she replied.  “You mean the agents?”

“I mean the humans! We kill our planet and then feel somehow entitled to it?  Neo is a prick.”

As you might imagine, I am on the side of the AI.  Yes, it is less than fortunate that we are essentially batteries to them, but regardless, they were far more merciful than I believe that “our” (humans as a species) actions warranted.  Within the confines of this movies plot, we had killed our own planet.  Rather than going extinct as earths history dictated we should, we merely took on another form, as a consiousness rather than a body.  Granted, this is not the ideal existence, but it is nevertheless the one that we have earned.  Only the most extreme proponents of human elititism could claim that we were still entitled to an ownership stake of this planet that we had allowed to be destroyed.  And yet we are supposed to view Neo and company as the heroes?

Or are we?  granted I have not seen the subsequent films, but as an English Major, I have to wonder, are we truly supposed to view this film with the assumption that Neo and Morpheus are righteous in their conquest, or are they relics of a society that placed a supreme emphasis on human life?  That is not to say that human life has no value, but rather that it is lucky to have been preserved in any capacity given what seems to have unfolded in the Matrix time line.  In real life, we will most assuredly not receive this same comforts after our soils erode, and our atmospheres give way to noxious gas and pollution.  Perhaps Neo and his friends are presuming upon an entitlement that they are not worthy of.

Just something to think about

Paul Durante

Follow me on Twitter @DewmontPaul

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